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Cherokee Sound

Village or Town
View from The Long Dock at Cherokee Sound. – Bahamas Ministry of Tourism

Cherokee Sound is a quaint community that is the most isolated settlement on Abaco. It has neat, narrow concrete streets and pastel painted houses. It is clean and quiet, surrounded by ocean beaches, an awesome creek teeming with marine life, and a blue-hole system with world class deep-sea and bone fishing. It has the longest dock in Abaco, known as The Long Dock, and the only over-water bridge on Abaco, referred to as Bridge Creek.

The people are extremely friendly and it is a close-knit community with everyone looking out for one another. The men and women are honest and very hard working; the majority of the men now make a living as craw fishermen or construction workers.

History

Colonel Thomas Brown is said to have founded Cherokee Sound in 1783, along with a group of other American Loyalists formerly from the Carolinas. Its attraction was the availability of fresh water and that it was the last ‘safe harbor’ on the Southeast coast of Abaco. Cherokee Sound allegedly got its name because Brown was formerly one of England’s liaisons with the Cherokee Indians.

Cherokee’s economy in the 1800s was mostly driven by wrecking, fishing, and farming. Today, it is primarily boat building and smack fishing (using locally-made fishing boats). In October 1988, the community of Cherokee Sound erected a monument dedicated to the Cherokee fishermen and their smacks. The people of this community once thrived from the fishing industry and distinguished themselves by carrying five sails rather than the usual seven on their fishing smacks. Scripted on the monument is information dating back from the mid 1800's to the late 1950's that includes the history of the fishing industry in that community, the names of the fishermen who drowned during a fishing trip, and the names of the smacks operating during that century.